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of protest. >> the german parliament approves billions in loans and guarantees to save greece from bankruptcy. >> with more and more shoppers seeking out handcrafted and traditional gifts, germany's famous christmas markets struggled to keep up with the demand. tens of thousands of egyptians are out protesting against president morsi at this hour after an islamist-led assembly raced through the approval of a new constitution, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assem
with a daring new plan to save greece. >> welcome back. greece has announced a plan to buy back bonds as part of its effort to reduce its debt load. >> the success of the plan is essential to unlocking the next payment of eight athens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work -- of aid to a thens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work. >> german finance minister wolfgang schaeuble and his french counterpart, pierre moscovici, went in front of parliament. >> things have to move fast. there is no reason to worry. the calculations are realistic. i hope it works. >> there is no plan b. >> the finance ministers brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
international says greece's handling of illegal migrants make it and i were the member of the european union. a senior official at the ministry told the bbc every year around 130,000 people are arrested when they enter the country illegally. we have more in this report. >> greece is a major gateway for migrants from asian and african countries trying to enter the european union. that they are discriminated against is not new but what this report is saying is that the mistreatment they are suffering now is reaching crisis levels. thousands are detained in an appalling conditions or left vulnerable in the streets where racist attacks happened on it almost daily basis. greece is at the front line of the migration challenge. more than 80% of migrants into into the european union and they do go through greece. thousands end up in detention camps and many of those who are not detained spent days and nights waiting to apply for asylum. other recent months, there has been a wave of attacks on immigrants, a number of them being stabbed to death. it is not just the illegal migrants or asylum seekers f
in recent history? and if things are so bad why haven't the british like say the people of greece or spain taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest
, the you chose not to abandon them, but greece continues to have to make drastic cuts, leaving marks that are visible throughout the country, including a long one of the world's most famous routes -- along one of the world's most famous routes. ♪ >> at precisely 42,195 meters long, this is the route that has become the standard for all marathon runners. the course was inspired by a 2500-year old myth, only today it is run on asphalt along with the capital's main roads. this is the bay where it said the lenda battle took place in 490 bc. it marked the first greek victory over the persians. according to legend, the athenian warriors gathered in a phalanx formation and managed to fight off a persian invasion. then a messenger ran the 42- kilometer distance to athens with news of the victory. at the local museum, the marathon's legacy is omnipresent. more modern-day hellenistic heroes have also been demoralize here. for instance, marathon runner who won the first olympic marathon in 1896. >> exactly like the car which they gave to the winner. >> at the eight-kilometer mark, there are r
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
. >>> want to know what a real fiscal crisis looks like? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if republicans don't change the way they do business they may be on the losing end of elections for years to come. plus, the black helicopter crowd is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives usña rich man' look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
with almost 12% of people out of work. crisis hit greece and spain edged with a quarter of the people jobless. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running
into the incident. workplace officials often fail to adequately enforce workplace safety standards. >> in greece, a bomb has exploded in an athens suburb. no one was hurt, but the explosion damaged adjacent businesses. some have called for banning the anti-immigrant party whose popularity has surged during the greek debt crisis. >> in belfast, protesters have clashed with police over plans to remove britain oppose the union jack flag from city hall. hundreds of protestant demonstrators attempted to storm the building after the majority catholic city voted to take it down. 15 police officers were injured. and these are testing times for a new push by the european union to reconcile serbia and its former southern province. >> although it has been almost five years since costs of a declared independence with western backing, tensions are just as high. still, there are optimists. we talk to the german commander of the nato-led peace keepers in the north of the country for more. >> our coverage begins. >> the bridge links the ethnic albanian and serve parts of the city appeared to this day, it is gua
agree come you both, do you agree with angela merkel's insistence on austerity for greece, spain and italy? >> austerity, yes. the definition of how much. but there's no way you can deal with that problem without a substantial degree of austerity in cases where they have excesses and bubbles and various parts of the economy and deficiencies. you can't sustainably bail them out without basically quid pro quo. on the other hand, let me say you can expect them to maintain austerity and less they're going to get -- that there will be some action. or within a definite period. and this is where kind of the rubber meets the road. everybody i think understands that, let's not call austerity, but you need very discipline policy by the borrower. unity willingness to lend on a part of the creditors. accreditors don't quite trust the borrower's. the borrowers don't quite trust the creditors that they will provide the money. so they don't do this on a grand scale. they do it, comes to kind of a, they differ too much. say, we'll go in for another three months. then a few months later they come
of the year of crisis with a steady hand. she has stuck to her goals in 2012 -- to save the euro and greece without compromising germany's financial stability. >> how alive is the concept of charity? we bring you an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
of hijacking the government. >> put us on a very slippery slope towards the plight of greece and spain and others who basically don't have that check. this whole notion of unlimited credit card is just pure poppycock and it's something that only can be dreamed of as a fiscally responsible thing in washington, d.c. >> but, you know, you still have a process and procedure in terms of the budget where the president proposes a budget and congress is playing a much more significant role in that process. when the time at which the idea of, you know, approving the debt ceiling was when congress was playing less of a role in the budget process. congress is far more engaged in that process. so, i don't think this is about going the way of greece or spain as much as it is, you know, people like to hold on to as much power as long as they think they can. >> karen -- >> ken, take a listen to what tom cole said earlier this week on taxes. take a listen to this. >> in my view we all agree that we are not going to raise taxes on people who make less than $250,000. we should take them out of this disc
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
of a break-up, notably let by a greece exit were too high, higher than keeping greece in. >> and who were some of the past winners? what in your point of view is the most important criteria for picking person of the year? what is this supposed to represent? >> it's an important contribution to innovation. we've had receive jobs, for example, as person of the year. we earlier, five years ago, we had picked shawn claude trichet, the then president of the european central bank because he led the central bank response in 2001. so i think it's someone who has made a decisive, positive contribution to economic policy, public policy and that is probably why we wouldn't choose the north korean lead, who just let up a north korean missile this week. >> are there any regrets over choosing trichet now? >> i don't think so. he played an important role. we think mr. draghi has been somewhat bolder in his approach, notably through the money transactions which are designed to intervene in the bond market to reduce spreads where, in effect, speculators are betting on a break up of the eurozone, which is
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
, greece. things are getting worse everywhere. the austerity measures, what austerityeasures? i got one. make a story. i'll make a bad bet. i n't want to take my losses. of take the money from you, mr. citizen. of tax you more, cat your services. what you do did you will pay more for my note that your pension and benefits. tom: how does all this in? we wind up with pitchforks? >> it's happening now. they don't call it class warfare. that is what is going on over there. again, there is no air spring. there's nothing about a pro-democracy ment. r tofew had much too much and way too many head was too little. the people in the street that one piece of the pipe command it's going on around the world. and for some reason people are oblivious to it. look in this country, college graduates, the income is declining eight or 0% since the recession. you can't find a job. 3 percent of them have jobs paying high-school wages. so you're right. it's not getting better, and again, we have the incompence in wasington making things worse. tom: but the numbers, you look at the numbers and you see those nu
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
saying the world was going to end because greece was going to default and leave the euro. it's all over. europe's fine. just give it a break. that was last year's story. [ overlapping speakers ] >> europe is not fine. spain is in significantly worse position. they've taken on more debt into deteriorating economy. you tell me how that translates to this has all been fixed and this is all solved. it's not solved at all. [ overlapping speakers ] >> spain has about the same debt to gdp ratio as germany. that good enough for you? >> [ overlapping speakers ] >> hang on, fellows. let's not get hung up on spain. what i want to come back to is the usa. because our market has not collapsed, it's really different than it looks like it was back in 2011. i just want to ask, is it better to own those low-rate bonds right now? or jim la camp, i want you both to weigh in quickly. is it better to own corporate bonds or treasury bonds during this tiff over the fiscal cliff, or is it better to own stocks? real quick. >> well, short term we're going to have a lot of gyrations. but those yields are under th
it in france. they just did it in spain. they just did it in the u.k. >> they did it in greece. they raised the added-value tax four times. it's devastating consumer spending, and we're heading down the same road. david: larry mcdonald, new edge senior director. good to see you. thanks for coming in, appreciate it. sandy? >> ford recalling nearly 90,000 vehicles. did your car make the list? we've got the details coming up. >>> plus, the chances of falling off the fiscal cliff, it's not stopping one top money manager from buying. bob doll, he sells us where he's putting his money to work now. that's next. there is no mass-produced human. every humabeing is unique. and ther one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world u'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you adjust to the suppo
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because they cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done a study. including all parts of the tax cuts, and you have sequest
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